Improving Your Videos

Video is here to stay, Catherine Baum, production coordinator for Double R Productions, told a NonProfit 2.0 audience recently.

So what can you do to make your video better?

Catherine along with Claudio Guglielmelli, production manager for Double R, shared many tips, starting with breaking the shoot into three parts: pre-production, production and post-production.

“There needs to be lots of planning before you even go to shoot,” Claudio said.

The planning should include deciding on your concept, what questions you will ask and what shots you need. “A script really helps with your editing,” Catherine said.

Photo from Double R Productions

When it comes to the shoot, Claudio said –

1)      Hold each shot for at least 10 seconds (your hand will get steadier)

2)      Shoot a variety of shoots, including ones that will help move your story along

3)      Use a tripod or a table to steady the camera

4)      Keep a shot list so that when you go into the editing room you will know what you have.

If at all possible, they recommended having a field producer for the shoot. “This person keeps everything organized,” Catherine said.

Editing is the consuming part of the process. They both emphasized not putting everything you shot in the final video. “Shorter is better,” Catherine said.

Editing software choices include Adobe Premier, Final Cut Pro and iMovie.

Are you ready for the big screen?

Video Conveys Message, What Does Yours Say?

Have you thought about sharing a message from your CEO, a sample of your latest project, client testimonials or interviews with field experts?

You can do that with video and post it to your website, which is then 53 times more likely to come up on the first page of a Google search according to a report by Forrester.

Catherine Baum, production coordinator with Double R Productions in Washington, D.C., also noted, “Video has impact. YouTube is the second largest search engine in the world.”

 “A lot of people can do it, but it’s about doing it right,” she shared recently at the NonProfit 2.0 Unconference. “Video is a window of your world.”

So what makes good video? Claudio Guglielmelli, production manager for Double R Productions, critiqued three levels of video.

Claudio shoots video for a client.

The first was using a flip-cam, which has grown in popularity, in part, because of its ease of use. Its downsides include a grainy look, no lighting and no camera mic. “What message are you sending?” Claudio asked.

A better level is using a double R cam, which requires some studio lights and delivers professional quality. The best level is a professional shoot with a professional actor and the addition of music, graphics and a customized opening and ending.

He challenged video users who say, “It’s just for the web,” noting that most people do their homework from the web.

“What is the first impression you want to make?” he asked.

(July 11 Post: Read some tips to improve your videography.)